Study shows the EAT-Lancet diet is unaffordable for at least 1.6 billion people

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A study has found the EAT-Lancet diet is unaffordable to 1.6 billion people, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

The ‘planetary health diet’ costs a median of USD $2.84 per day, which is about 60% more expensive than a diet that meets our minimum nutritional requirements. The study found that the diet costs between 3% to 73% of national average incomes. Fruit and vegetables and animal-sourced foods are the most expensive components of the EAT-Lancet reference diet.

The EAT-Lancet diet has many flaws, it is not the perfect diet. But it generates good discussion about what needs to be done to make a healthy and sustainable diet affordable for the global population. A cost-effective diet must be optimised on cost per nutrient or bundle of nutrients. The issue with the EAT-Lancet reference diet is that it involves switching from low cost sources of nutrition to more expensive sources to deliver the nutrients we need. Even then, the EAT-Lancet diet falls short on supplying nutrients such as iron and calcium in adequate amounts, and the protein quality of the diet is lower.

Furthermore, switching to more expensive sources of nutrition means supply and demand can get out of balance due to demand increasing from those who can afford those foods. Supply may not be able to react quick enough, for example, tree nuts take 3 to 10 years before the trees start producing nuts. As a result, prices will increase, and food will become even less affordable to some of the population.

To make a sustainable diet affordable by the global population, the cheapest source of quality, bioavailable nutrients should be prioritised. For example, in the US, dairy is the lowest cost source of dietary calcium, riboflavin and vitamin B12, and should therefore be prioritised.

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